The “Mammanu” Old Bakery

SAC-B-037

My name is “Mammanu”, from the nickname of the family I belonged to, in Leccese dialect, it refers to midwifery profession, la mammana.
The name of the road where I am found, Borgo Orto Preti Street, refers, in the past, to the property of the parish authority...

My name is “Mammanu”, from the nickname of the family I belonged to, in Leccese dialect, it refers to midwifery profession, la mammana.
The name of the road where I am found, Borgo Orto Preti Street, refers, in the past, to the property of the parish authority. There were bakeries larger than I in the town, but today I remain the only one still intact, and for this, in 2004 I became public property.
Created in a unique environment, the ovens, whose mouths were closed with a metal plate, were structures made in pirumafu, a type of fireproof Leccese stone. They belonged to the local feuds or professional bakers and were often used by local habitants.
They were normally used in different moments during the day. In the morning, with high temperatures, for the production of bread and friselle (long-life rusk bread) and evenings, with lower heat, for the making of biscuits, typically called pasterelle.
The dough was made at home or right there, with durum wheat, from the mill, mixed with yeast, that was most of the times exchanged among different families, who also used to gather twigs of wood necessary for the baker at the ovens.
These practices tell of an authentic sociality and of a strong sense of community, bringing out pleasing anecdotes of every day life.

Latitudine 40°01'01.71"N
Longitudine 18°21'49.10"E

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